Postdoc Profile – Christopher Strickland

Christopher Strickland on a hill with the ocean in the background

Christopher Strickland hiking in New Zealand.

SAMSI postdoctoral fellow, Christopher Strickland was born in Houston, Texas and lived briefly there and in Dallas before he could really remember either place. He grew up in Oxford, Mississippi. His grandfather was Chair of Modern Languages at the University of Mississippi and helped to establish a study abroad program, and his grandmother was originally from France, so many summers his father and grandfather traveled to France. When Christopher went to ” Ole Miss,” in the honors college, he minored in physics before switching degrees and getting a double degree in Mathematics and French.

At first he was following a more pure math route. He went to the University of Florida in Gainesville for his Master’s degree and was studying logic, but after about a year and a half, he realized this was not the area he preferred. After changing his focus to dynamical systems and defending his Master’s thesis, he stayed in Gainesville for a year as he tried to figure out what to do next and taught mathematics at Santa Fe Community College. He knew he would prefer to get into an area that involved applied math instead of pure math. He became interested in mathematical ecology and had heard that Colorado State University had a great program in ecology and the natural sciences, so he applied there to get his mathematics Ph.D.

Christopher considers Patrick Shipman, who was a new faculty member at Colorado State at the time, and Gerhard Dangelmayr, who is the Chair of the department, to be his mentors. They were also his co-advisors. Christopher and Patrick started collaborating on projects right away.

“I was headed toward dynamical systems which is really related to mathematical ecology, so I worked with Patrick and Gerhard for the next six years,” Christopher said, “I still collaborate with both of them, and we are currently applying for a research grant to work with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Commission.” Christopher has also collaborated with Patrick Shipman and Snehal Shetye at Colorado State on a project modeling the mechanical properties of spinal cords.

Nate Burch told me about SAMSI originally,” said Christopher. “Nate and I were colleagues at Colorado State.” So, when the Ecology program was announced, he applied and was accepted.

Christopher Strickland standing on a rocky edge

Christopher Strickland hiking in Australia.

While he’s been at SAMSI, Christopher has worked on getting various parts of his dissertation re-written into smaller parts so that he can publish each part in various journals. He has three of the four published. The manuscript of the fourth one is completed, and has been submitted as of June 2015.

Christopher has been participating in two working groups this year: The Tipping Point group and the Physical Ecology group. The Physical Ecology group led by Laura Miller, has been particularly interesting for him. “We recently had this really great workshop at SAMSI, which was for the people participating in the working group. We invited Nadia Kristensen from the University of Queensland who brought in all this great data from parasitoid wasp release and spread. That’s been really nice because I mostly do modeling of dynamic systems and the model that she had with this data could be something I could help her improve,” he commented.

“We are also working on a review paper, which is something the working group conceived of sometime around December. The entire working group and even some other people, including some ecologists and my advisor from Colorado State, Patrick, is working on this review,” Christopher said. He believes the review will be completed by the end of this summer.

Much of Christopher’s research focuses on networks, specifically looking at spread and control of contagions on the network. One example would be to look at container shipping networks or airline networks. He is working on a grant that is looking at white nose bat syndrome that involves a network of caves. While bats could spread the disease themselves from cave to cave, there is also the concern that hikers or cavers could get the fungus on their boots and spread the disease when they hike in a different cave. By figuring out how these networks work, it may help ecologists figure out where the disease might spread next, or help them to get a disease under control.

Christopher Strickland makes a kick

Christopher practicing Cuong Nhu.

When Christopher is not at work, he is either playing a game of soccer (he used to be on a math league!) or he is practicing the art of Cuong Nhu, (meaning hard/soft in Vietnamese) a type of martial arts that was brought to the United States in Gainesville, Florida. Christopher is on target to get his black belt, probably in about a year. “A lot of scholarly people actually do this type of martial arts. It has been a good way to network,” quipped Christopher. He also spends time with his girlfriend, Anne Ho, who is a theoretical mathematician. They like to travel a lot, many times to national parks or overseas.

In the fall, Christopher will be teaching at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill while he completes his second year as a postdoctoral fellow for SAMSI.

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