Former Postdoc Kenneth Lopiano Speaks at RTP180

Dr. Kenneth Lopiano, co-founder of Roundtable Analytics and former postdoctoral fellow at SAMSI, spoke to a sold out crowd last night at the RTP180 event. RTP180 is a monthly after-hours get together where speakers spend about 5 minutes talking about a topic they are passionate about, and that highlights some of the research happening in the Triangle region. It’s kind of like a mini TED talk meets Pecha Kucha.

Kenneth Lopiano on stage

Kenneth Lopiano talking at RTP180.

Lopiano spoke about the simulation model he and others developed to help ER departments become more efficient. You can read more about it here.

Some of the comments on Twitter included: @nxtstop1 “”Round table analytics” ~ does work in ERs using simulation models to determine best practice for that particular dept~

@Jnewbay “Emergency departments moving more efficiently? I’m in! Shorter wait times in the ER?

@bentanthony01 “ pitching at – Are you tired of waiting at Emergency Department? ED simulation models

@HealthView “We need actionable insights to healthcare data says Roundtable Analytics <Hear! Hear!”

You can watch the full video, including Kenneth Lopiano’s presentation here.

Emergency Department Simulator Uses Analytics to Help Administrators Make Data-Driven Decisions

Emergency departments (EDs) are under growing pressure; while the number of ED visits have sharply increased, the number of EDs serving this need has actually decreased. According to a report from Rand Corporation, ED doctors are increasingly becoming the decision-makers regarding hospital admissions. Today, nearly half of all non-obstetrical hospital admissions occur through the ED. With the adoption of the Affordable Care Act, it is expected the number of ED visits will continue to rise. ED staffs are, therefore, looking for ways to make effective decisions to make their departments more efficient.

A group of researchers from the University of Florida and the Statistical and Applied Mathematical Sciences Institute (SAMSI) have created an online simulator to help hospital ED administrators understand how analytics and simulation can be used to inform decisions in the ED. In particular, the simulator reveals how various factors or decisions affect the flow of patients through the ED. The group includes, Kenneth Lopiano, SAMSI; Joshua Hurwitz, Jo Ann Lee, Scott McKinley, James Keesling, University of Florida Department of Mathematics; and Joseph Tyndall, University of Florida Department of Emergency Medicine.

flow map of an ED

Flow map.

The simulator is freely available on the web at http://spark.rstudio.com/klopiano/EDsimulation/. On the website doctors or administrators can change several different variables to best mimic the conditions in their particular ED. For example, one can change the number of beds, number of doctors, number of nurses for various hours of the day, or number of patients entering the ED at different times of the day.

Lopiano, who was a postdoctoral fellow at SAMSI during this past year’s Data-Driven Decisions in Healthcare research program, learned about the power of simulation in healthcare through SAMSI-sponsored working groups. It was during a visit to his alma mater, the University of Florida, to discuss his SAMSI experiences when Lopiano learned of lead author Joshua Hurwitz’s efforts. There Lopiano connected with former SAMSI postdoctoral fellow and assistant professor Scott McKinley who introduced Lopiano to Hurwitz. Realizing their common research interests, the core research group was formed which led ultimately to the online simulator, principally developed by Lopiano and Hurwitz. The online simulator has seen substantial increases in traffic since the publication of their research paper in BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making.

photo of Dr. Kenneth Lopiano

Dr. Kenneth Lopiano

The simulator recognizes that the causes of ED crowding are variable and require site-specific solutions. For example, in a nationally average ED, provider availability can cause bottlenecks in patient flow while investments in other resources may not have the positive impact an administrator would expect. Further, the simulator recognizes that by reallocating resources and creating alternate care pathways, some EDs can dramatically expedite care for lower acuity patients without delaying care for higher acuity patients.

Lopiano, co-founder and principal collaborator of Roundtable Analytics, a healthcare analytics company based in Raleigh, North Carolina, said, “A simulator is very effective because it is risky for health systems to implement overhauls in their care-delivery systems. By using a simulator, administrators are able to evaluate many different scenarios without making these costly and time-consuming changes. Most importantly, administrators can understand the consequences of operational decisions, both intended and unintended.”

The paper published in BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making is available at: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6947/14/50. Kenneth Lopiano may be contacted at klopiano@roundtableanalytics.com.